Hey guys!

hootowlinitiative:

David here, and like Caera (cethornton3) already said, I just wanted to mention that we’re here to help you in any way possible. If you want advice or even just want to vent, feel free to use the ask box. That’s what it’s there for! You guys are also welcome to send me an ask on my personal…

Math class makes me so scared.

❤️❤️

❤️❤️

blackout-escapist:

bagmilk:

*concerned white parent voice* sweetie don’t write on yourself you can get ink poisoning

image

(Source: heteroh, via dangniblets-sweetflabbit)

so-tellmedarling:

Happy Birthday!

so-tellmedarling:

Happy Birthday!



drawingwerewolves:

ragingnewborn:

venusian-eyes:

buttsbutts:

Get it because it’s a CELL WALL

oh my god

NOT BREATHING

SCIENCE NERDS

drawingwerewolves:

ragingnewborn:

venusian-eyes:

buttsbutts:

Get it because it’s a CELL WALL

oh my god

NOT BREATHING

SCIENCE NERDS

(via pleasedissolvewithme)

artandsciencejournal:

Encased

A frame is not the only way to encase an artwork for display. More artists are experimenting with plastic resins or glass to create their pieces. The resin preserves the work, more so than a wooden frame would do. The results are often similar to prehistoric sap with various objects from leaves to bugs, found within them.

If it wasn’t for plastic resin, some of artist Peter Alexander’s works would not even exist, as his piece “Cloud Box” (1966) consisted of “introducing water vapor to the liquid resin during the casting process” which created the cloud within. The artist was actually able to ‘catch’ a cloud, or technically, create a cloud and trap it forever, thanks to the resin.

Another artist who tampers with their resin to create unique pieces is Michal Macku, who in 1989 began working with ‘gellage’, his own invention of combining collage elements and gelatin. Working with gelatin prints, the artist is able to reshape his photographs, “changing their relationships and endowing them with new meanings during the transfer”. He then combines this process with state-of-the-art technology to great his large scale glass gellages, which trap his images in a 3D setting, rather than flat like a photograph.

Roni Horn’s “Well and Truly” (2009-2010) plays with illusion, where the work at first seems like a container holding water, but inspecting the piece reveals the work’s true medium; a solid cylinder of glass. The artist emanates the characteristic of water, its changeability, by allowing air to come into contact with the top of the glass as it sets in its mold, creating a smooth gloss. The artist undermines “all certainty about [the piece’s] solid or liquid nature” changing the physical experience of the viewer.

Changing physical materiality is also present in Kirsten Baskett’s pieces, such as “Autonoma”. Baskett etches delicate images onto fine Japanese kozo paper, later encasing them in clear resin, and the once “fragile paper becomes indestructible and untouchable”. The artist sees her pieces as frozen in time, permanently available to view, but never to experience the true materiality of the object captured within.

-Anna Paluch

(via wonderfullywandering-alone)

so-tellmedarling:

(Photo not mine. Just the edit)

so-tellmedarling:

(Photo not mine. Just the edit)

P-AP GRM!

You’ve got the right to remain right here with me.

( Speed of Love (via so-tellmedarling) )
mom:
did you get home safe?
me:
no i died a few times

You’re the sky that I fell through, and I remember the view whenever I’m holding you.

( Adam young (via lonelyaroundpeopletoo) )
owlcity-gifs:

We drank the great lakes like cold lemonade.And both got stomach aches sprawled out in the shade.So bored to death you held your breath and I tried not to yawn.You make my frown turn upside down and now my worries are gone.

owlcity-gifs:

We drank the great lakes like cold lemonade.
And both got stomach aches sprawled out in the shade.
So bored to death you held your breath and I tried not to yawn.
You make my frown turn upside down and now my worries are gone.

Just sitting.

Just sitting.

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